Today marks the 50th Anniversary of Maslow’s death, the man responsible for the theory behind The Hierarchy of Needs. Maslow’s Theory, originally devised in 1943 is still the widely accepted foundation for understanding human motivations. In many ways he was the father of what SELFDRVN stands for. 

 

As technology advances, we are becoming increasingly disconnected from the people around us. Let’s not forget what it means to have human bonds. I’m talking about the moments you shared with the pioneering team that you used to spend late nights with in a small office to build the 100-man company you have today. Do you even remember your employees’ names and birthdays without Facebook? 

 

The humanity we show each other is the bridge that connects the employee to their full potential. It’s not the job description that enticed them to start their journey with you. It was the promise that they could become morebecome better, learn more, contribute more, be a more productive member of society. It’s not the bonus that motivates them to do a good job. It’s the celebrations in the office with the people we care about that makes us fight that much harder so we can all go home as heroes. 

 

These are the self-actualised forms of people, and what they look like. It’s never about the beanbags in the office or nap pods (though those would be lovely to have), it’s about whether your work makes an impact, and if people recognise those contributions. It’s a powerful thing.

 

And Maslow was onto it over 50 years ago! 

 

To honour the driving principles behind the power of our software and the values we champion, we invite you to tell us a story of one office hero in your company and why this person deserves the SELFDRVN “MASAWARD for the self-actualised. Think of it as an OSCAR for Employee Engagement. No speech about your mum though, keep it short and sweet so I can go home on time.

More details on the prize at a later date, so be sure to follow us on LinkedIn and Facebook for more details! 

 

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